colourlessness

noun
the visual property of being without chromatic color
Ant: ↑color (for: ↑colorlessness)
Derivationally related forms: ↑colourless, ↑colorless (for: ↑colorlessness)
Hypernyms: ↑visual property
Hyponyms: ↑achromia

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • colourlessness — noun The state or quality of being colourless …   Wiktionary

  • colourlessness — See: colourless …   English dictionary

  • achromaticity — noun the visual property of being without chromatic color • Syn: ↑colorlessness, ↑colourlessness, ↑achromatism • Ant: ↑color (for: ↑colorlessness) • Derivatio …   Useful english dictionary

  • achromatism — noun the visual property of being without chromatic color • Syn: ↑colorlessness, ↑colourlessness, ↑achromaticity • Ant: ↑color (for: ↑colorlessness) • Deriv …   Useful english dictionary

  • colorlessness — noun the visual property of being without chromatic color • Syn: ↑colourlessness, ↑achromatism, ↑achromaticity • Ant: ↑color • Derivationally related forms: ↑colourless ( …   Useful english dictionary

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